wizzleworld Fractals


Today, you can find hundreds of digital artists all across the world who are making art that is incorporating fractal elements, and all these artists come with their own styles. Just take a look how many fractal art examples are on Pinterest or check out this video:

While algorithmic art is objectively showing the mathematical or geometric structure in a highly pleasing aesthetic way, there are also fractal artists who are daring to take it all to the next level and use fractal elements in their artworks that are appealing in a subjective way to spectators’ emotions and feelings.

In this article, I review the styles of Kerry Mitchell, Mark Townsend, and  Janet Parke, and you’ll notice that all three fractal artists come with their own recognizable and well-developed styles.

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We live in a country in which many are deeply religious, yet so few actually know about religion. According to a recent survey, not only do Americans know very little about people of other faiths and what they believe, they also know precious little about their own religions!

That’s why I am glad for this new project, called Faithbook:
PBS (the Public Broadcast System, a TV station that is supported by donations (rather than advertising), for those readers outside the US) is hosting a new feature on their website, called Faithbook. Subtitled “God in America” it certainly is full of assumptions, but I will assume good intent.

The project is documenting how Americans actually feel about religion and spirituality in their own words, and you can browse what others believe, too. They ask a series of guided questions and people create their own profiles to answer them, so we get to see the diverse mosaic that is US culture. I have started my Faithbook page, and am answering the questions slowly.

I encourage all of you out there reading this to create a Faithbook page and answer the questions. If not for anyone else, certainly for yourself!

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My love affair with web graphics started shortly after I did my first homepage back in June of 2012. It was a simple page, made up of graphics I found surfing the net. People on the web are incredibly generous in putting up great graphics and everything you need for a decent page can be grabbed with your browser or an ftp program.

The one limitation I ran up against very quickly was the size of the graphic. So I bought JASC Paintshop Pro from their website. It turned out to be a lucky choice. Not only could I re-size graphics, but I could add borders, text, contour, change their colors and more. Most of my 2012 Christmas graphics, my first venture into original stuff, were made with Paintshop.

At $65, Paintshop is a real bargain and will satisfy your urge for creativity for a long time. The tutorial that came on the CD rom was excellent and there is more help now at the Paintshop site to get you started plus there are many websites that offer tutorials.
Which Is the Right Program for You?

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It’s true.  We are all searching our “unique artistic voice” so that, as artists, we can make an impact on our community and one day, the world.  Many people want to “separate themselves from the pack” and be on their own path. But just because we want to be individuals in art – doesn’t mean we have to do it alone.

Look at all the great artists of our history.  Many of the famous creators from our past and present hung out with each other, learned from each other and collaborated with each other.

They understood that creating great art means you have to surround yourself with inspiring people.  Not so you can copy their work, but to be able to learn from their experiences and be inspired toward their own perspective.  Don’t believe me?

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Fractal Art consists primarily of mathematically-inspired, computer generated, abstract images that, in a very powerful way, are reflecting the beauty and intensity of mathematics, a facet that’s often overshadowed by the subject’s dry analyses and formulas.

Fractal Art images are generated by using fractals, and fractals are generated by repeatedly iterating a simple formula that uses complex numbers, meaning numbers that include 2 parts that correspond to a computer screen’s two dimensions.

These fractal images can be identified by their own characteristic pattern which is repeated at different scales all through the image. Fractals also come with the property that, in a mathematical sense, they are having infinite detail, meaning that you could zoom endlessly (sure, as far as your computer allows you to) into a fractal that will not change the structure.

These two features (the repeating pattern and infinite detail), make that fractals are used to picture to model various natural phenomena. There are people, and I am one, who find them very interesting.

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There is no easy answer to your questions on iteration traps and patterns. It is important to separate the two issues in your own mind. They are completely different and independent concepts. Patterns originated as a routine called Cross Stitch that I never published.

The reason I didn’t publish it is that I knew that it would have to be used in conjunction with some sort of masking routine in order to be effective and I realized that it would be better to combine them. Since I had already written Iteration Traps, it made sense to combine them; hence, Iteration Trap Patterns.

The next video is also a helpful introduction to fractals:

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